Vancouver

Bailey Bros. and Granville Stationery Co.: Part 3 of a Series

(If you haven’t yet read them, start with part 1 and part 2 of this series.) I ended the previous installment of this series in 1911, when Granville Stationery Co. (headed by William Payne and J.P. Mott Woodworth) assumed control of Bailey Bros.’ wholesale department, having taken over its retail store at 540 Granville the… Continue reading Bailey Bros. and Granville Stationery Co.: Part 3 of a Series

Kamloops · Vancouver

Bailey Bros.: Photographers and Booksellers, Part 2

Picking up where I left off in part 1 of the Bailey Bros. story, Charles Bailey’s death in 1896 must have struck a major blow to the photography and stationery firm he left behind, and to his business partner and brother, William. Charles had been the man behind the lens for so many Bailey Bros.… Continue reading Bailey Bros.: Photographers and Booksellers, Part 2

Kamloops · Vancouver

Bailey Bros.: Photographers and Booksellers, Part 1

Many Vancouver history buffs know Bailey Bros. as the scenic photographers who captured enduring images of a young city and of British Columbia in the late 1880s and early 1890s (1). But fewer people know that the Baileys were also among Vancouver’s earliest booksellers and stationers. Charles Bailey, the younger of the two brothers, was… Continue reading Bailey Bros.: Photographers and Booksellers, Part 1

Vancouver

The End of Gaskell Book & Stationery and Thomson Stationery

I wrote last time about the rise of Manfred Gaskell’s bookselling mini-empire: as of mid-1914, he owned two Gaskell Book & Stationery stores in Vancouver and a branch in New Westminster, plus Thomson Stationery’s main operation in Vancouver and a branch in Victoria. At the height of his business boom, Gaskell’s business equity amounted to… Continue reading The End of Gaskell Book & Stationery and Thomson Stationery

Vancouver

Manfred Gaskell: Boom and Bust

In 1909, when Manfred Gaskell, Edward Odlum, and Albert Stabler bought Thomson Stationery Company, the firm was said to have the largest book stock in all of Canada (1). By 1914, Gaskell had bought out both of his partners. He also had three stores operating as the Gaskell Stationery Company: two in Vancouver, at 679-681… Continue reading Manfred Gaskell: Boom and Bust

Vancouver

Thomson Bros.: Booksellers and Ambitious Entrepreneurs

When Margaret MacLean, wife of first Vancouver mayor Malcolm MacLean, travelled on the CPR to join her husband on the west coast in the fall of 1886, with her on the train to Port Moody was Melville Patrick Thomson (1). Thomson was coming from Calgary, where he and his brother, James Arthur, ran a successful… Continue reading Thomson Bros.: Booksellers and Ambitious Entrepreneurs

Vancouver

William Harrison and the B.C. Book Store

I’ve previously published quite a lot about Seth Thorne Tilley, one of Vancouver’s first booksellers (if not the first; click here for the beginning of Tilley’s story). We know that Tilley operated a store in Vancouver prior to the Great Fire of June 1886, and that he rebuilt on Cordova Street following the fire. This… Continue reading William Harrison and the B.C. Book Store

Vancouver

Clarke & Stuart: A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

In 1894, when Vancouver’s first bookseller, Seth Thorne Tilley, exited the bookselling business, he handed the baton to Harold Clarke and James Duff-Stuart. The two were former clerks with Thomson Bros., one of Tilley’s main rivals in Vancouver. After purchasing the business, they renamed it Clarke & Stuart. Initially they remained in Tilley’s location at… Continue reading Clarke & Stuart: A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words